Moe's Game Table: Get Rich Quick Review

Moe's Game Table: Get Rich Quick Review

Publisher: FoxMind

Game Designer: Lenny Herbert

Players: 3-5

Playing Time: 30-45 minutes

 

Fame and fortune

Everybody dreams of living large, making boatloads of cash and acquiring all of the fame. For the majority of us, it’s just a pipe dream that we’ll never come to realize. Thanks to FoxMind, we can now live out that fantasy vicariously with their latest board game Get Rich Quick!

FoxMind has aimed squarely for the family games market and they’re doing a fantastic job of it. Their games are easy to teach, quick to play and are just really fun for any age group.

Choose your path

In Get Rich Quick you test your business wits against 3-5 other entrepreneurs, with the winner being the first to reach 25 fortune points. This is a very simple gateway game that plays in about 45 minutes, making it a great after dinner game for the holidays or anytime.

All players receive a dozen meeples, 7 action cards and $5,000 in seed money to make their run at gaining those 25 fortune points. From investing in real estate to stocks, start-up launches and even the lottery, there are a multitude of ways to make money. That money is spent at the shopping mall to purchase fortune points and other bonuses to get you to your goal.

Action Cards

Action Cards

The main driver in the game is the simultaneous action selection; everyone chooses three of the seven available action cards each turn. After the choices are revealed simultaneously, they are carried out in numerical order.

The seven cards you have to work with provide different benefits, some are safe and automatic, while others require risk, but can pay off quite handsomely. Going to work nets you $1000, while taking a break gains you 1 fortune point. The third safe option is to go shopping, this is what will make or break you in the game. Shopping is where you spend all those duckets to gain fortune points and special abilities, bringing a slight engine building aspect to the game.

Launch a start-up!

Launch a start-up!

The risk cards are based on player participation, paying a 3-to-1 return can be lucrative but it’s all in the timing. Penny stocks get you $3,000 if at least one other player does not play this card, which isn’t too hard to get in a five player game. The threat doubles with the real estate card, paying $6,000 if two other players don’t play the card on that turn. Finally, the biggest payoff at $10,000 comes from launching a start-up, but you must be the only one playing that card. Making the big bucks on the risky actions is tough, because every player’s action choices impacts the outcomes for the others. Therein lies the challenge and the fun!

Regardless of whether or not you receive the payoff, you will always pay the fee. Risk is how you will get ahead but weigh those risks before spending your money, don’t squander your resources too quickly and needlessly. It doesn’t hurt to be a bit cautious and take the near sure thing. This is a good way to build up a base to take those calculated risks further on. Reading your opponents and deciphering their intent will be a big key in knowing when to take those risks and when to play it safe. I really like how the game makes you think and observe, watching your opponent’s tendencies. It’s not deep thinky, but an adequate level that most gamers should enjoy without feeling intimidated.

Another reward option is the lottery, it has a low cost but also the highest potential return rate. That is if you can get five of a kind on a five die roll, something most people will rarely see. It’s a fun and tempting option that you’ll soon realize is nearly as pointless as the real lottery. It’s not bad to take a gamble every so often, when you have an extra grand burning a hole in your pocket. Otherwise, it’s pretty much guaranteed lost money.

Winner, winner, chicken dinner!

Winner, winner, chicken dinner!

Then it’s time to head over to the shopping mall. Once the money starts to flow in, you can amplify those gains with the bonuses at the mall and work towards a win buying fortune points. This is where you can get an engine of sorts going, in terms of gaining extra actions and cheaper costs for follow on actions. There are some cascading choices to be made, adding some nice layers of depth in a simple game.

Although this is not a worker placement game, it does share some similarities. With limited slots at each of the shopping locations, there is the potential for a little bit of take that. If you have the money and know another player wants a certain ability, you can take block it by placing a meeple there.

Does it gain fame and fortune?

I really enjoy what FoxMind is doing here with Get Rich Quick. It’s a fun little exercise in gauging your best move each turn, while trying to determine what your opponents will do. There are some fun decisions to be made without being complicated, keeping the game a challenge while still inclusive for gamers of all ages.

The component quality is ok, it uses paper money and fairly thin counters. I think games today are better served with cash counters since paper money tears way too easily. The board has a lot of options spread across it and can be a tad difficult to follow. This can slow the pace of the shopping phase somewhat as players take their time to read and find the different options available to them.

Despite these small niggles, I find the game to be a lot of fun as did everyone I introduced it to. There are different avenues to winning the game, thanks to the plethora of options in the shopping mall and strategies they’ll inspire. Get Rich Quick has very good replay value, with room for further exploration in repeated plays.

If you’re looking for a fun gateway game to play with your family and friends, Get Rich Quick is one put under the tree this holiday season!

 

Company Website: http://www.foxmind.com/

Company Twitter: https://twitter.com/FoxMind

Note: A copy of this game was provided to me for this review.

Follow me on:  Twitter  Facebook  Instagram

The Good, the Board, and the Ugly: The Sallen Coefficient - Vanuatu

The Good, the Board, and the Ugly: The Sallen Coefficient - Vanuatu

What's Eric Playing? #126: Cooking Rumble [Preview]

What's Eric Playing? #126: Cooking Rumble [Preview]